Twothirds Water launches crowdfunding campaign

A Vancouver startup that has developed a portable water purification system for use in developing countries is planning to use crowdfunding to jumpstart the business.

A Vancouver startup that has developed a portable water purification system for use in developing countries is planning to use crowdfunding to jumpstart the business.

Twothirds Water, which developed a small, easy-to-use water purification system similar to the pumps used by backpackers, has launched a crowdfunding campaign at Indiegogo.

The startup has already raised $60,000 in angel funding and hopes to raise at least $20,000 more through the Indiegogo campaign.

The water purification system – called Tapp – uses microfiltration to remove pathogens from water. The filter can connect to tubes or screw onto bottles. Although Tapp can be used by backpackers, the company's founders feel the best market for the product is in Third World countries where water-borne illnesses are a major cause of death and disease.

The Indiegogo campaign is based on pre-orders. For every Tapp system that is bought through the campaign for $58, one additional Tapp filter will be donated to a family somewhere in a Third World country.

"We've designed Tapp for some of the most difficult environments in the world," said Bradley Pierik, co-founder and president of Twothirds Water.

"Tapp is extremely simple and user-friendly. Half the world's hospitalizations are caused by easily avoidable waterborne disease. We need a product that is easy-to-use and durable under even the toughest conditions – from back-country trekking to disaster relief in developing countries."

nbennett@biv.com

@nbennett_biv

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