How much would it cost to use Facebook ad-free?

A Vancouver digital marketing agency has uncovered some surprising results in its search to answer that question.

A Vancouver digital marketing agency has uncovered some surprising results in its search to answer that question.

Most users expect social network content to be free, and see online ads as a necessary evil when it comes to keeping in contact digitally.

But how much would it cost to make your social network experience advertisement-free?

Vancouver’s Junction Creative decided to look at the advertising revenue and revenue growth for some of the most popular social networks and calculate how much it would cost, per user, to access these networks ad-free.

The results may be surprising.

The most expensive by far was Facebook – and at $5.04 a year, many may consider this quite a bargain in exchange for a less-cluttered user experience. That works out to $0.42 per month.

According to the study, the annual and monthly user fees, by social networking site, would be:

  • Facebook: $5.04 per year, $0.42 per month;
  • Twitter: $2.29 per year, $0.19 per month;
  • LinkedIn: $1.50 per year, $0.13 per month;
  • YouTube: $1.17 per year, $0.10 per month.

A slightly more detailed breakdown of how the numbers were generated can be found here.

ecrawford@biv.com

@EmmaCrawfordBIV

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